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Tools for working with reactive data

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This package works with Cloudflare Workers
This package works with Node.js
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JSR Score
100%
Published
a month ago

Cygnals

an illustration of a cygnet

Tools for working with reactive data

Written in Typescript

Tiny file size

Zero dependencies

Installation

This package is published to JSR and NPM

NPM

https://www.npmjs.com/package/cygnals

Package Manager Command
NPM npm install cygnals
Yarn yarn add cygnals
pnpm pnpm cygnals
Bun bun add cygnals

JSR

https://jsr.io/@dnbkr/cygnals

Package Manager Command
Deno deno add @dnbkr/cygnals
NPM npx jsr add @dnbkr/cygnals
Yarn yarn dlx jsr add @dnbkr/cygnals
pnpm pnpm dlx jsr add @dnbkr/cygnals
Bun bunx jsr add @dnbkr/cygnals

Tutorial

State

Encapsulate data that can change using state

const message = state("hello");

You can set the state, and get the current state for any given point in time:

const message = state("hello");

message.current(); // "hello"

message.set("hello, world");

message.current(); // "hello, world"

And you can subscribe to changes:

const message = state("hello");
message.subscribe(console.log); // Console: "hello"

message.set("hello, world"); // Console: "hello, world"

if your handler only cares about future changes, you can do that too:

const message = state("hello");
message.onChange(console.log);

message.set("hello, world"); // Console: "hello, world"

both .subscribe and .onChange return unsubscribe functions too

const message = state("hello");
const unsubscribe = message.onChange(console.log);

message.set("hello, world"); // Console: "hello, world"

unsubscribe();

message.set("hello?"); // nothing is output, because you unsubscribed

Computed / derived values

If you want to calculate a value from some other values, you can do that too

const message = state("hello");
const shouted = from(message, (message) => message.toUpperCase());

shouted.current(); // "HELLO"

from returns a Readable, which is the same as what .state returns, except without the .set method, so it can be subscribed to in the same way.

It's also lazily evaluated, so your computation function will only be run when .current or .subscribe is called.

And you can track multiple values too:

const a = state(1);
const doubled = from(a, (a) => a * 2);
const b = state(3);
const sum = from([doubled, b], (doubled, b) => doubled + b); // 5

With just state and from you've got the nuts and bolts of a reactive data system. But there's some more tools included to help you out...

Async

It's common to need to deal with async values. state and from don't do anything special when your value is a promise:

const url = state("/api");
const promise = from(url, fetch); // the value of this readable is a Promise

but if you want to deal with the value of your promise without any hassle, you can:

const url = state("/api");
const request = from(url, fetch);
const response = fulfilled(request); // the value of this readable is a Response

Note that in the above example, if you change the url state with url.set then your response readable will (eventually) change with the new response too.

You might need to know if the promise is pending, for example to animate a loading spinner in your UI:

const url = state("/api");
const request = from(url, fetch);
const busy = pending(request); // the value of this readable is a boolean

or if the promise rejects too:

const url = state("/api");
const request = from(url, fetch);
const error = rejected(request); // the value of this readable is a unknown, because a promise could reject with anything as the reason

and actually, you might want all these things at once:

const url = state("/api");
const request = from(url, fetch);
const response = unwrapPromise(request); // the value of this readable is `{ result, pending, error }`

Readonly

If you have a piece of state and you just want to expose a read only view of it, you can use this utility:

const message = state("hello");
const readOnlyMessage = readonly(message);

if you want to create a value that can never change, you can do

const immutable = readonly(state("hello"));

Limitations

It's not uncommon to want to filter a source of values when deriving your new value. You can do that with limitations:

const number = state(1);
const oddNumbers = limit(number, (number) => number % 2 === 1);
oddNumbers.subscribe(console.log); // Console: 1
number.set(2); // nothing is logged to the console
number.set(3); // Console: 3

And you can pass in a bunch of limitations; they are evaluated in order and just need to return a boolean - true if you want to keep the value and false if you want to filter it:

const oddOnly = (number) => number % 2 === 1;
const lessThanSeven = (number) => number < 7;

const number = state(3);
const filtered = limit(number, oddOnly, lessThanSeven);
filtered.subscribe(console.log); // Console: 3
number.set(4);
number.set(5); // Console: 5
number.set(6);
number.set(7);

Limitation functions are passed a second parameter - a writable. This is the writable that the limit function stores internally which will be returned as a readable to consume. One example of this being useful would be if you wanted to alter the time that values are written to the store, such as with a debounce...

Debounce

An included limitation function is debounce. It can be useful when you're wanting to react to state changes and expect the upstream state to change rapidly, such as a text input field that controls an async action when the user has finished typing:

const input = state("");
const search = limit(input, debounce(500));
const results = fulfilled(
  from(search, (search) => fetch(`/search?q=${search}`))
);

You need to specify the number of milliseconds the debounce should wait for subsequent changes before firing.

DOM

If you're client-side you can bind to DOM events easily:

import { fromEvent } from "cygnals/dom";
//                        ^^^^^^^^^^^^^
//             notice the different import path
//

const button = getElementById("my-button");

const clicks = fromEvent(button, "click");

clicks.onChange(console.log); // this will log every time the button is clicked

React

You can use the bundled react hook to make use of any readable:

import { state } from "cygnals";
import { useCygnal } from "cygnals/react";

const message = state("Hello!");

export function Component() {
  const value = useCygnal(message);
  return <p>{value}</p>;
}

you can see the value in the normal way:

import { state } from "cygnals";
import { useCygnal } from "cygnals/react";

const count = state(0);

export function Component() {
  const value = useCygnal(count);
  return (
    <button onClick={() => count.set(count.current() + 1)}>
      You have clicked the button {value} times
    </button>
  );
}
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